Hontiveros pleased with ‘nationalistic’ displays at Clark Museum

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One of the country’s progressive legislators cited the displays at the Clark Museum, revisiting the depiction of struggles and triumphs in the conversion of this former US military airbase into a leading employment center of the region.

In her visit here Saturday, Senator Risa Hontiveros cited the Clark Museum for its displays of what she calls as “nationalistic elements” at the four galleries of the facility.

“It is good to note the many displays that have nationalistic elements at the museum,” she said as she toured the two-storey museum.

She gave particular attention on the display that presents the historic 12-11 voting by the Philippine Senate in 1991 that rejected the RP-US Bases Treaty. The Treaty would have prolonged the stay of American troops in many military bases, including the former Clark Air Base.

The lady senator, chairman of Anakbayan, also asked if the rejection of the continued stay of American troops 25 years ago whether served as boon or bane to the local communities.

For his part, Noel F. Manankil, officer-in-charge of Clark Development Corporation, said that there are now about 90,000 employees inside the Freeport here. He said that the former Clark Air Base had only about 20 to 30,000 direct and indirect employees.

Manankil thanked the Senator for taking the time out to visit Clark despite her busy schedule. She was to speak before Rotary Club of Angeles Kuliat in Angeles City after visiting the museum on a rainy Saturday afternoon.

Among the displays at the Clark Museum are various plans, programs, documents that present the government conversion programs for Clark, including books, reading materials that called for productive civilian use of the former airbase that were published prior to the rejection of the proposed treaty.

Among them is “Kumbersyon”, a publication that presents alternative uses of former US military facilities in the Philippines. Also on display are publications authored by by UP Professor Roland Simbulan including “The Bases of our Insecurity”